Archive for the ‘stereotypes’ Category

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Being responsible versus being given a responsibility (or several)

February 18, 2013

What is the difference between being responsible and having responsibilities? To give someone a responsibility does not necessarily mean that the person is now responsible. The word “response” which means “a reaction or reply” to something, is the word I think of when the words responsibility or responsible come to mind. Actually, a friend mentioned this thought to me at a dinner outing last night…we were sitting at Noodles and Company, close to where I live, and we were talking about that briefly over a scrumptious (boy I love that word!) meal of spicy Indonesian peanut saute noodles. A person may have the responsibility of raising a child, but that alone does not a responsible person make. There are countless stories in news, past and present, of young people and celebrities having children without regard to the kinds of RESPONSIBILITIES they would have to face, and when they do not face them properly, they are not RESPONSIBLE.

A responsibility is an obligation bestowed on someone, and “being responsible” is a character trait usually acquired over a certain period of time. The length of time depends of course on environmental factors such as life experience, age, education level (sometimes, not always) and other things. We may explore some of these other things in future posts. People with disabilities can certainly be responsible. That discussion deserves its own post.

Being responsible is learned behavior. NT people learn it by observation and imitating peers. So too can autistic people, but it can take much longer. First do we understand what a responsibility is? Autistic advocates definitely have responsibilities that they take on themselves. Some of us organize protests against Autism Speaks events. Others organize major events such as the ASAN annual gala. Need link to this. Include more examples)
Others give presentations at Autreat, the annual retreat by and for autistic people.

The advocates who participate in these activities have chosen to take on these responsibilities. They are not forced or coerced by others to do these activities. These are real responsibilities though, just like going to work if one has a job, going to school (in my case) or taking care of one’s children. And some autistic people have children too, but that isn’t all that relevant except it is another responsibility that some of us have.

We will have other blog posts upcoming about things related to this: specifically we have plans for a post about the damage parents/family can do to autistic people by calling them “irresponsible” for not doing certain things. If you have something to say about that, or this post, we would love to hear from you!

Collaborative, all of us (finished by Athena)

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From Kittymama-Spread the word to End the Word(s)

November 2, 2012

More on the issue of using words to hurt people, this time from a slightly different cultural perspective. It says pretty much the same thing. Definitely a good read and well worth sharing!

Thanks to my headmate-sister for finding this. However, autistics are not all unable to lie. They can fall victim to corruption too. Maybe not to the extent of elected officials (but could that also be partly because few if any elected officials are known to be autistic?) yes we are capable of BEING corrupted! It happens all the damn time! But not in the conventional sense. Whenever we are told we can’t do this or that because of our disabilities, we are being corrupted, if we end up BELIEVING those lies. That will be the subject of another post, eventually.

Sorry to Athena for hijacking her reblog. She asked me to finish it for her.

Athena and Ivan

Okasaneko Chronicles

In 2009, at the height of the campaign for the Philippine Presidential Elections, the word that critics used to disparage then-senator-turned-presidential aspirant Benigno Aquino III was “autistic.” You see, Filipinos don’t like using the R word as much as the A word. Call it a cultural difference, but here in the Pearl of the Orient Sea, we like to insult people with the A word.

As a result, I wrote “To Senator Noynoy (An Open Letter to Senator Noynoy Aquino from a Mother of an Autistic Child)” in 2009. This was my answer to the people who liked to abuse the word “autistic’ and I quote:

If being autistic means not being able to lie, then by all means, I should be proud to say I am autistic.

If being autistic means not being able to cheat and rig elections, then call me autistic.

It being autistic means not…

View original post 818 more words

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Reblogged: An Open Letter to Ann Coulter

October 24, 2012

More on the response to Ann Coulter’s insensitive tweet! This letter is amazing! I wouldn’t have been able to write something like this completely devoid of anger and harshness. Whether Ann Coulter understands this letter and takes it seriously doesn’t matter one bit. What is FAR MORE IMPORTANT is that many people are speaking out and responding to these kinds of letters from people who write them. People are talking about this issue and taking a stand. That’s how we can effect change.

Bravo, John!

Andrea

The World of Special Olympics

The following is a guest post in the form of an open letter from Special Olympics athlete and global messenger John Franklin Stephens to Ann Coulter after this tweet during last night’s Presidential debate.

Dear Ann Coulter,

Come on Ms. Coulter, you aren’t dumb and you aren’t shallow.  So why are you continually using a word like the R-word as an insult?

I’m a 30 year old man with Down syndrome who has struggled with the public’s perception that an intellectual disability means that I am dumb and shallow.  I am not either of those things, but I do process information more slowly than the rest of you.  In fact it has taken me all day to figure out how to respond to your use of the R-word last night.

I thought first of asking whether you meant to describe the President as someone who was bullied as a child…

View original post 260 more words

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Ann Coulter, The Disability Community is Coming after you!

October 23, 2012

Damn. I had almost an entire post written, and then My ipod decides to crash without saving it! This woman is able to spread her filth because the rest of us except her listeners don’t give a fuck. Well, if we want to send a message loud and clear not only to her but more importantly TO THE REST OF SOCIETY that this kind of crap will no longer go unchallenged, ITS TIME TO START GIVING A FUCK!!!!!!!! Get on social media, write letters to her sponsors, write to newspapers! LET US BLANKET THE NATION WITH OUR OUTRAGE!

Its more than just some dumb woman spewing hate. She is showing her hatred for an entire group of people (nothing new there) but let us make the result much different! Silence no more!

Athena

This Side of Typical

Or, like I like to refer to you, Cunty McCunterson.

Wow.  just…wow.  You know, I “get” that you get your attention by using shock value.  I understand that every fucking thing you say really has no meaning, or weight, or substance.  I get that you are just some lonely woman who needs the attention, good or bad.  Usually bad. I get that.  And I would give you a patronizing pat on the head any day of the week for that.

But really?

*sigh*  after last night’s debate, you did it.  AGAIN.  

And now no doubt you will trot out a little dog and pony show telling the world you should have used a different word.

Well, I’m going to stand by mine.  Cunt.

First off, it was the most OBVIOUS play to distract from Romney’s obvious loss with your stupid words.

But the second, and most important point.  By…

View original post 182 more words

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Call for Proposals for 2013 SDS Conference

October 20, 2012

The Society for Disability Studies has announced a call for proposals for their annual conference in 2013 in Orlando Florida. Location details as well as submission guidelines and specifications for each categories can be found here

Let us make our voices heard! This conference, while not autism specific, is a great way to spread our message of inclusion and let others know what works well in terms of advocating for needs and such.

This is also a good platform to try and break down stereotypes about people with disabilities

I am not the best writer so I haven’t done justice to the SDS in writing this but all the info as well as topics from past conferences are on the site I linked to. Please post any questions in the comments section and I will do my best to answer them.

Andrea

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Please Respond to “Falling”

October 16, 2012

Fellow advocates, we need to have many responses to this play. Just because I reblogged it does NOT mean we support it! I haven’t seen this play, nor do I plan to, but we really need to make sure that people hear what we feel about it. If someone is hardy enough to sit through it, that would be a definite plus. Perhaps there should be peaceful demonstrations outside the theater, much like we do at autism speaks walks. Thanks!

Andrea

ETA: if anyone has seen the play and feels like writing a review for it, please feel free to share it in comments section. Positive or negative reviews. Please explain what you liked or didn’t like and why. Discussion is important.

Beyond Autism Awareness

JULIA MURNEY IS A STANDOUT IN AUTISM DRAMA “FALLING”

Julia Murney Is a Standout in Autism Drama 'Falling'

Josh’s favorite activity is tilting open a cardboard box full of white feathers that’s perched on a wall shelf just above his head and letting the contents fall on his face. It is among the few calm moments in his day. Josh is 18 years old, overweight, autistic, and aggressive in “Falling,” Deanna Jent’s fascinating play being given a stellar production at the Minetta Lane Theatre.

“Falling” focuses on Josh’s effect on his family. The toll seems heaviest on his mother, Tami (Julia Murney), who with Josh’s father, Bill (Daniel Pearce), has developed an endless series of routines, rituals, and little games to distract or entertain her son to get him through the day and keep him from attacking people. Daniel Everidge gives a brave and persuasive performance as Josh, portraying a big, awkward baby who…

View original post 411 more words

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Heated debate with family members

October 14, 2012

I was talking to my sister and mother about autism. Heated debate, ugh, got frustrated. They don’t understand about autism rights. Mom told me that the websites I visit for the real truth about autism, may not be true after all. I think I would know better, thank her very much.

This happened many months ago, and we cannot even really remember at all what exactly the content of the discussion was, except what was written above as a draft. I am pretty sure this is a common theme in the disability community; heated debates with nondisabled family members about advocacy related things. They think they know us better than we do! How many people have been told at some point in life, by family or relatives, that the time spent online seeking out POSITIVE writing about xyr disability, or positive advocacy, is wasted time?

Collaborative, Andrea and Athena

talinorfali

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